Ryan James MacFarland: Polaroids



Polaroid Archive   |   Artist's Website   |   Artist's C.V.   |   RSS Feed   |   Questions & Comments


Ryan James MacFarland, Bent Pine, 2013, Unique Fujifilm Instant Print, 3.375 x 4.25 inches, Edition of 60 + 5 APs, $150 or free for membersI am happy to share this new edition created for the Shandaken Project artist residency program in Upstate New York. The Shandaken Project supports experimentation by emerging and mid-career artists, writers and thinkers, and curators and other producers of culture with free residencies that include room, board, and studio space.  
I was a resident at the Shandaken Project in summer 2012. While there, I worked in the studio familiarly known as “Bent Pine,” so named for the unusual tree growing beside it. The bizarre distortions produced by the studios’ PVC windows remained with me in the months after my residency. The next year, I proposed to make Bent Pine—a series of unique photographs documenting the tree, shot from within the studio.
The photographs defy catagorization: they are unique prints from an analog process that appear digitally manipulated and mechanically reproduced. Bent Pine continues my longstanding interest in imaging and abstracting the natural world.Buy Bent PineSee all Shandaken Project editionsLearn more about membership

Ryan James MacFarland, Bent Pine, 2013, Unique Fujifilm Instant Print, 3.375 x 4.25 inches, Edition of 60 + 5 APs, $150 or free for members

I am happy to share this new edition created for the Shandaken Project artist residency program in Upstate New York. The Shandaken Project supports experimentation by emerging and mid-career artists, writers and thinkers, and curators and other producers of culture with free residencies that include room, board, and studio space.  

I was a resident at the Shandaken Project in summer 2012. While there, I worked in the studio familiarly known as “Bent Pine,” so named for the unusual tree growing beside it. The bizarre distortions produced by the studios’ PVC windows remained with me in the months after my residency. The next year, I proposed to make Bent Pine—a series of unique photographs documenting the tree, shot from within the studio.

The photographs defy catagorization: they are unique prints from an analog process that appear digitally manipulated and mechanically reproduced. Bent Pine continues my longstanding interest in imaging and abstracting the natural world.

Buy Bent Pine
See all Shandaken Project editions
Learn more about membership